Pronouns

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Pronouns

What do you mean it’s “the green” in French? – Some Gr. 9 French Student Somewhere

A lot of students struggle with the idea of pronouns, and so do teachers, teaching them.  If you are looking for other

tenses, such as present tense, past tense, and future tense, click on the links provided.

Having to constantly remind students of pronouns every class…

But the way pronouns work in French is quite simple, as teachers know!

In French, every noun must have a pronoun!

Important note: 

Every noun has a gender in French (masculine or feminine)

Also, every noun can be singular or plural

Examples:

Le chien (masculine singular) – the dog

La chaise (feminine singular) – the chair

Les chiens (masculine plural) – the dogs

Les chaises (feminine plural) – the chairs

Because every noun is masculine or feminine; singular or plural, there are multiple different correct pronouns.

How can you tell if a verb is masculine, or feminine?

Follow this simple rule to be right about 80% of the time (good rule of thumb for students):

If it ends in an E, it is feminine, otherwise it is masculine

Examples:

Le chat – masculine (it ends in t, not e) – the cat

Le stylo – masculine (it ends in an o, not an e) – the pen

La tablette – feminine (it ends in an e) – the tablet

La chaussure – feminine (ends in an e) – the shoe

Obviously, this isn’t always the case, but it gives students an easy general rule to follow, and then they can learn the exceptions as they go.

How can you tell if a noun is singular or plural?

Follow this simple rule:

If it ends in x or s, it is plural

Note: You can also tell if the word is masculine or feminine still, even if it is plural. Just look at the letter before the x or s! (If it is an E, that word is feminine, if not, it is masculine)

Examples:

Les chiens – masculine, plural – the dogs

Les châteaux – masculine, plural – the castles

Les filles – feminine, plural – the girls

Les nuages – feminine, plural – the clouds

What are the 4 most common pronouns?

They are the following:

The, my, of, and at

Here is how to say these 4 in French:

TheMyOfAt
Masculine SingularLeMonDe (Du – de le)Au
Feminine SingularLaMaDe laÀ la
Plural (For both masculine and feminine)LesMesDesAux

Note: The pronouns take the gender of the word they are describing, NOT the person describing them. This leads to strange things like a boy having a head that is feminine, in French.

Examples: 

For a boy, it is ma tête, for his head, even though the boy is masculine, the word tête is feminine, and pronouns take the gender of the word they are describing.

The:

Le chat – the cat

La giraffe – the giraffe

Les arbres – the trees

My:

Ma chambre – my room

Mon auto – my car

Mes frères – my brothers

Of:

Du printemps – of spring

De la personne – of the person

Des enfants – of the kids

At:

Au parc – at the park

À la patinoire – at the skating rink

Aux jeux – At the games

Note: In French, we don’t say we’re going to places, like in English. Instead, we say we’re going “at” places.

More Practice:

Need more practice? Here are some worksheets you can try out as extra practice.

Interested in getting all the French grammar modules? Look here.

Futur Simple – Irregular Verbs

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How Do I Conjugate Irregular Verbs in Futur Simple?

In the distant future, I won’t worry about French anymore! – Some student in grade 7, somewhere

So many verb tenses and so little time…

Today we’re going to talk about how to conjugate irregular verbs in Futur Simple in French. If you’re looking for the present tense, or the future proche, passé composé, futur simple for regular verbs or the exceptions to passé composé (Vandertramp), follow the links provided.

The future tense refers to what will happen in the future. For futur simple, the timing refers to a general time in the future. It is an absolute necessity to understand how to conjugate this tense, as we use it all the time.

In order to learn how to conjugate these verbs, we have to first learn a little about subjects:

Here are the common subjects in French (for more information, click here):

Je (I)

Tu (You)

Il (He)

Elle (She)

On (We)

Nous (We)

Vous (You/You all)

Ils (They)

Elles (They)

Note: The subject is the thing that does the action in the sentence.

Finally, here are the steps to conjugating these irregular verbs in passé composé:

  1. Take the infinitive of the verb, and change it depending on the verb it is
  2. Add endings depending on the subject

Simple as that.

Step 1 – Take the infinitive of the verb and change it depending on the verb it is

List of exceptions in Futur Simple:

Venir – Viendr

Devenir – Deviendr

Revenir – Reviendr

Avoir – Aur

Aller – Ir

Être – Ser

Faire – Fer

Savoir – Saur

Devoir – Devr

Pouvoir – Pourr

Step 2 – Add endings depending on the subject

Je -ai

Tu -as

Il -a

Elle -a

On -a

Nous -ons

Vous -ez

Ils -ont

Elles -ont

Examples of verbs conjugated in futur simple:

  1. Conjugate être for the subject “elles” in futur simple:

Elles seront

  1. Conjugate aller for the subject “nous” in futur simple:

Nous irons

  1. Conjugate revenir for the subject “on” in futur simple:

On reviendra

There you have it, how Futur Simple works for irregular verbs in French!

Extra help!

Need more practice? Here are some worksheets you can try out as extra practice.

Interested in getting all the French grammar modules? Look here.

Futur Simple – Regular Verbs

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How Do I Conjugate Regular Verbs in Futur Simple?

In the distant future, I won’t worry about French anymore! – Some student in grade 9, somewhere

So many verb tenses and so little time…

Today we’re going to talk about how to conjugate regular verbs in Futur Simple in French. If you’re looking for the present tense, or the future proche, passé composé, or the exceptions to passé composé (Vandertramp), follow the links provided.

The future tense refers to what will happen in the future. For futur simple, the timing refers to a general time in the future. It is an absolute necessity to understand how to conjugate this tense, as we use it all the time.

In order to learn how to conjugate these verbs, we have to first learn a little about subjects:

Here are the common subjects in French (for more information, click here):

Je (I)

Tu (You)

Il (He)

Elle (She)

On (We)

Nous (We)

Vous (You/You all)

Ils (They)

Elles (They)

Note: The subject is the thing that does the action in the sentence.

Finally, here are the steps to conjugating these irregular verbs in passé composé:

  1. Take the infinitive of the verb, and don’t change it (unless the verb is an re verb, in which case you remove the “e” at the end of the infinitive)
  2. Add endings depending on the subject

Simple as that.

Step 1 – Take the infinitive of the verb

Marcher, choisir are examples of verb infinitives. If the verb ends in re, you have to remove the “e”, for example, for rendre, it becomes rendr

Step 2 – Add endings depending on the subject

Je -ai

Tu -as

Il -a

Elle -a

On -a

Nous -ons

Vous -ez

Ils -ont

Elles -ont

Examples of verbs conjugated in futur simple:

  1. Conjugate marcher for the subject “elles” in futur simple:

Elles marcheront

  1. Conjugate choisir for the subject “nous” in futur simple:

Nous choisirons

  1. Conjugate rendre for the subject “on” in futur simple:

On rendra

There you have it, how Futur Simple works for regular verbs in French!

Extra help!

Need more practice? Here are some worksheets you can try out as extra practice.

Interested in getting all the French grammar modules? Look here.

Imparfait

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How Do I Conjugate Regular Verbs in Imparfait?

In the past, French couldn’t have been this hard, could it? – Some student in grade 9, somewhere

So many verb tenses and so little time…

Today we’re going to talk about how to conjugate regular verbs in imparfait in French. If you’re looking for the present tense, or the future tense, or passé composé, follow the links provided.

The past tense refers to what happened in the past. For imparfait, it refers to general things that have happened in the past, or repeated actions in the past. It is an absolute necessity to understand how to conjugate this tense, as we use it all the time.

In order to learn how to conjugate these verbs, we have to first learn a little about subjects:

Here are the common subjects in French (for more information, click here):

Je (I)

Tu (You)

Il (He)

Elle (She)

On (We)

Nous (We)

Vous (You/You all)

Ils (They)

Elles (They)

Note: The subject is the thing that does the action in the sentence.

Finally, here are the steps to conjugating verbs in imparfait:

  1. Conjugate the verb in present tense for the subject “nous”
  2. Remove the “ons” at the end of the word
  3. Add the appropriate ending depending on the subject

Simple as that.

Step 1 – Conjugate the verb in present tense for the subject “nous”

For ER Verbs:

Marcher ———-> marchons

For IR Verbs:

Choisir ———-> choisissons

For RE Verbs:

Rendre ———-> rendons

Step 2 – Remove the “ons”

For ER Verbs:

Marchons ———-> March

For IR Verbs:

Choisissons ———-> Choisiss

For RE Verbs:

Rendons ———-> Rend

Step 3 – Add the ending, depending on the subject

Endings for all the subjects:

Je – ais

Tu – ais

Il – ait

Elle – ait

On – ait

Nous – ions

Vous – iez

Ils – aient

Elles – aient

Examples of verbs conjugated in imparfait:

  1. Conjugate marcher for the subject “elles” in passé composé:

Elles marchaient

  1. Conjugate choisir for the subject “nous” in passé composé:

Nous choisissions

  1. Conjugate rendre for the subject “on” in passé composé

On rendait

There you have it, how imparfait works for verbs in French!

Extra help!

Need more practice? Here are some worksheets you can try out as extra practice.

Interested in getting all the French grammar modules? Look here.

Futur Proche

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How Do I Conjugate Verbs in Futur Proche?

In the future, French won’t be so hard, right? – Some student in grade 7, somewhere

So many verb tenses and so little time…

Today we’re going to talk about how to conjugate verbs in Futur Proche in French. If you’re looking for the present tense, or the past tense, follow the links provided.

The future tense refers to what will happen in the future. Especially when the time is very near in the future. It is an absolute necessity to understand how to conjugate this tense, as we use it all the time.

Good news!

All verbs follow the same pattern in Futur Proche. Once you’ve learned this, the future tense will be very easily accessible to you.

In order to learn how to conjugate these verbs, we have to first learn a little about subjects:

Here are the common subjects in French (for more information, click here):

Je (I)

Tu (You)

Il (He)

Elle (She)

On (We)

Nous (We)

Vous (You/You all)

Ils (They)

Elles (They)

Note: The subject is the thing that does the action in the sentence.

In order to conjugate verbs in futur proche, we must first conjugate aller, in present tense, one of the 8 most common verbs in French. (For a lesson on that, click here).

Finally, here are the steps to conjugating these verbs in futur proche:

  1. Conjugate aller in present tense
  2. Put the infinitive of the verb you’re conjugating after

Simple as that.

Step 1 – Conjugate Aller in Present Tense

Je vais

Tu vas

Il va

Elle va

On va

Nous allons

Vous allez

Ils vont

Elles vont

Step 2 – Put the Infinitive of the Verb After

What is the infinitive? It is the verb not changed at all!

Marcher, danser, choisir, are all examples of verb infinitives.

Examples of verbs conjugated in futur proche:

  1. Conjugate marcher in futur proche for the subject “ils”

Ils vont marcher

  1. Conjugate choisir in futur simple for the subject “nous”

Nous allons choisir

  1. Conjugate attendre for the subject “on” in futur proche

On va attendre

There you have it, how passé composé works for irregular Vandertramp verbs in French!

Extra help!

Need more practice? Here are some worksheets you can try out as extra practice.

Interested in getting all the French grammar modules? Look here.

Passé Composé – Vandertramp

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How Do I Conjugate the Irregular Vandertramp Verbs in Passé Composé?

Where could I have gone that French wouldn’t be so hard? – Some student in grade 8, somewhere

So many verb tenses and so little time…

Today we’re going to talk about how to conjugate irregular verbs in passé composé in French. If you’re looking for the present tense, or the future tense, follow the links provided.

The past tense refers to what happened in the past. Especially when the time is very specific in the past. It is an absolute necessity to understand how to conjugate this tense, as we use it all the time.

Why are the verbs on this list irregular?

They are irregular because they do not follow the pattern of the usual ER/IR/RE verbs in passé composé, unfortunately (though if you do want a lesson on the regular verbs in passé composé, click here).

In order to learn how to conjugate these verbs, we have to first learn a little about subjects:

Here are the common subjects in French (for more information, click here):

Je (I)

Tu (You)

Il (He)

Elle (She)

On (We)

Nous (We)

Vous (You/You all)

Ils (They)

Elles (They)

Note: The subject is the thing that does the action in the sentence.

In order to conjugate the irregular vandertramp verbs in passé composé, we must first conjugate être, in present tense, one of the 8 most common verbs in French. (For a lesson on that, click here).

Finally, here are the steps to conjugating these irregular verbs in passé composé:

  1. Conjugate être in present tense
  2. Change the verbs on the list into their past tense form 
  3. Agree the verb with the subject

Simple as that.

Step 1 – Conjugate Être in Present Tense

Je suis

Tu es

Il est

Elle est

On est

Nous sommes

Vous êtes

Ils sont

Elles sont

Step 2 – The Vandertramp List

It is called Vandertramp because of the mnemonic used to remember all of the irregular verbs that are conjugated with être instead of avoir in present tense. Here it is (including all of the past tense form of the verbs):

D – Devenir (Devenu)

R – Revenir (Revenu)

M – Monter (Monté)

R – Rentrer (Rentré)

S – Sortir (Sorti)

V – Venir (Venu)

A – Aller (Allé)

N – Naître (Né)

D – Descendre (Descendu)

E – Entrer (Entré)

R – Retourner (Retourné)

T – Tomber (Tombé)

R – Rester (Resté)

A – Arriver (Arrivé)

M – Mourir (Mort)

P – Partir (Parti)

Step 3 – Agreement

When I say you need to agree the verb with the subject, I mean that there are extra endings added, depending on what the subject is. These are added after the past tense form of the verb.

Agreements for all the subjects:

Je – nothing or “e” (if the subject is feminine, add an extra e)

Tu – nothing or “e” (if the subject is feminine, add an extra e)

Il – nothing

Elle – add an extra “e”

On – nothing

Nous – “s”, or if the group is all women, add an “es”

Vous – nothing or “e” (if you are only referring to one person with “vous”, add an extra “e” if that person is a girl). “S” or “es” if plural (“es” if it is a group of all girls)

Ils – “s”

Elles – “es”

Examples of vandertramp verbs conjugated in passé composé:

  1. Conjugate naître for the subject “elles” in passé composé:

Elles sont parties

  1. Conjugate descendre for the subject nous in passé composé

Nous sommes descendu(e)s (“e” depends on if the group is all girls or not, if it is, “e” is added)

  1. Conjugate tomber for the subject “on” in passé composé

On est tombé

There you have it, how passé composé works for irregular Vandertramp verbs in French!

Extra help!

Need more practice? Here are some worksheets you can try out as extra practice.

Interested in getting all the French grammar modules? Look here.

How Do I Conjugate Regular Verbs in Passé Composé?

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What have I done to deserve a French class like this? – Some student in grade 7, somewhere

So many verb tenses and so little time…

Today we’re going to talk about how to conjugate regular verbs in passé composé in French. If you’re looking for the present tense, or the future tense, follow the links provided.

The past tense refers to what happened in the past. Especially when the time is very specific in the past. It is an absolute necessity to understand how to conjugate this tense, as we use it all the time.

But what is a regular verb?

Regular verbs are verbs that have been put into categories since they all follow the same pattern.

There are three categories of regular verbs: ER/IR/RE

Each of these categories refers to the endings of the verbs.

Examples:

Marcher is a regular ER verb in present tense

Choisir is a regular IR verb in present tense

Rendre is a regular RE verb in present tense

In order to learn how to conjugate these verbs, we have to learn a little about subjects:

Here are the common subjects in French (for more information, click here):

Je (I)

Tu (You)

Il (He)

Elle (She)

On (We)

Nous (We)

Vous (You/You all)

Ils (They)

Elles (They)

Note: The subject is the thing that does the action in the sentence.

In order to conjugate regular verbs in passé composé, we must first conjugate avoir, in present tense, one of the 8 most common verbs in French. (For a lesson on that, click here).

Finally, here are the steps to conjugating a regular verb in passé composé:

  1. Conjugate avoir in present tense
  2. Remove the ending (ER/IR/RE)
  3. Replace the ending with the correct ending, depending on whether the verb is ER/IR or RE

Simple as that.

For ER Verbs, the pattern is as follows:

SubjectAvoir in Present TenseEnding change
J’aié
Tuasé
Ilaé
Elleaé
Onaé
Nousavonsé
Vousavezé
Ilsonté
Ellesonté

Example: 

Conjugate “marcher” in passé composé for the subject “il”

Il a marché

For IR Verbs, the endings are as follows:

SubjectAvoir in Present TenseEnding change
J’aii
Tuasi
Ilai
Elleai
Onai
Nousavonsi
Vousavezi
Ilsonti
Ellesonti

Example:

Conjugate “choisir” in passé composé for the subject “elles”

Elles ont choisi

For RE Verbs, the endings are as follows:

SubjectAvoir in Present TenseEnding change
J’aiu
Tuasu
Ilau
Elleau
Onau
Nousavonsu
Vousavezu
Ilsontu
Ellesontu

Example:

Conjugate “rendre” in present tense for the subject “vous”

Vous avez rendu

There you have it, how passé composé works for regular verbs in French!

Extra help!

Need more practice? Here are some worksheets you can try out as extra practice.

Interested in getting all the French grammar modules? Look here.

How Do I Conjugate Regular Verbs in Present Tense?

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What do I do now? – Some student in grade 8, somewhere

So many verb tenses and so little time…

Today we’re going to talk about how to conjugate regular verbs in the present tense in French.

The present tense refers to what is happening right now. It is an absolute necessity to understand how to conjugate this tense, as we use it all the time.

But what is a regular verb?

Regular verbs are verbs that have been put into categories since they all follow the same pattern.

There are three categories of regular verbs: ER/IR/RE

Each of these categories refers to the endings of the verbs.

Examples:

Marcher is a regular ER verb in present tense

Choisir is a regular IR verb in present tense

Rendre is a regular RE verb in present tense

In order to learn how to conjugate these verbs, we have to learn a little about subjects:

Here are the common subjects in French:

Je (I)

Tu (You)

Il (He)

Elle (She)

On (We)

Nous (We)

Vous (You/You all)

Ils (They)

Elles (They)

Note: The subject is the thing that does the action in the sentence.

Finally, here are the steps to conjugating a regular verb in present tense:

  1. Remove the ending (ER/IR/RE)
  2. Replace the ending with the correct ending, depending on the subject

Simple as that.

For ER Verbs, the endings are as follows:

SubjectEnding
Je-e
Tu-es
Il-e
Elle-e
On-e
Nous-ons
Vous-ez
Ils-ent
Elles-ent

Example: 

Conjugate “marcher” in present tense for the subject “il”

Il marche

For IR Verbs, the endings are as follows:

SubjectEnding
Je-is
Tu-is
Il-it
Elle-it
On-it
Nous-issons
Vous-issez
Ils-issent
Elles-issent

Example:

Conjugate “choisir” in present tense for the subject “elles”

Elles choisissent

For RE Verbs, the endings are as follows:

SubjectEnding
Je-s
Tu-s
IlNo ending
ElleNo ending
OnNo ending
Nous-ons
Vous-ez
Ils-ent
Elles-ent

Example:

Conjugate “rendre” in present tense for the subject “vous”

Vous rendez

There you have it, how the present tense works for regular verbs in French!

Extra help!

Need more practice? Here are some worksheets you can try out as extra practice.

Interested in getting all the French grammar modules? Look here.